Montgomery County Community College

ENG 236 Fiction YO

Syllabus for Fall 2003

 

Instructor:

Peter C. Scheponik

 

Texts:

The Art of the Tale, ed. by Daniel Halpern

A Contemporary Guide to Literary Terms, by Edwin J. Barton and Glenda A. Hudson

 

Description:

This course aims to cultivate an appreciation of the commentaries and influences on contemporary civilization by European, Asian, African, and American writers of fiction. The short story and/or the novel will be studied in terms of structure, plot, setting, character development, point of view, tone, and style, which, in concert, will provide a deeper understanding of the author’s vision.

 

Attendance:

Since discussion/attendance form 50% of the grade for the course, students are expected to logon every week and participate in all discussions. 

Attendance will be based on the students’ weekly responses on Wednesdays and Fridays. 

Any student who fails to respond for a period of two weeks will be automatically withdrawn from the class.

Should there be an emergency(ies), the student must inform the instructor of the reason(s).

 It is up to the instructor to excuse or not excuse the absence.

Each unexcused absence will lower a student’s final average for the course by one full letter grade.

Four or more unexcused absences will result in a final grade of “W” or “F.”

 

Course Requirements:

Regular attendance

Regular participation: attentive listening, completing required readings before each class discussion, sharing ideas during each class discussion.

One (1) three-to-five page explication/analysis paper, based on one of the stories in the syllabus.

One (1) short explication/definitions final, based on the stories in the syllabus and the literary terms used throughout the semester.

 

Grading:

Attendance/participation – 50%

Explication/analysis paper – 25%

Essay final – 25%

 

Requirements for Papers:

Typed

Double spaced

12 pt Times New Roman

MLA format

Must have centered title

Must have work cited sheet (only citing from the required text)

Carefully proofread for spelling, grammar, and sentence variety

Handed in on due dates

No resubmission for higher grades

Policy on late papers:

I only accept late papers from students who have come to me in advance, and, even then, I determine whether or not I will allow a late submission.  Papers handed in late—without my permission—receive an automatic “F.”

***Sample student paper under “Course Documents” button****

 

Final Exam:

Essay/short definitions format

Specifications under “Course Documents” button

 

 

Academic Honesty:

Collaboration vs. Cheating:

I define collaboration as follows: working with other students as directed in workbook activities, assisting one another in drafting activities for research paper, or helping one another with library activities.

 

I define cheating as follows: doing none of the work in the workbook and just copying another’s answers, writing another’s research paper, copying another’s research paper, doing another’s library research or having another do yours for you, copying or giving answers to one another on the final, plagiarizing in any form

 

Policy on plagiarism:

Plagiarism will result in an automatic “F” for the plagiarized paper and, quite possibly, for the course. See full policy as presented on College Web page.

 

 

Objectives:

This course will familiarize students with the application of literary devices in the explication/analysis of short fiction.

This course will introduce students to common critical approaches used in literary analysis.

This course will engender an understanding of the meaning of universality as applied to literary analysis.

This course will develop a deeper awareness of the purpose and process of short fiction and the cathartic and philosophic dimensions it offers humanity.

 

Behavior:

Building community is essential.

The more global the world becomes, the greater the need for understanding, tolerance, and cooperation.

People who value others and themselves have a tendency to flourish.

The ability to nurture fosters intellectual, emotional, psychological, physical, and spiritual well being.

We will all work together to create a sense of genuine community in this class.

No bias or bigotry will be tolerated.



Course Schedule: 

 

Please note that this schedule is just a chronological overview.  The specific corresponding assignments and discussions will be found under the “Assignments” and “Discussion Board” buttons in Blackboard.

 

Week One: 9/3—9/6

Introduction/explication of syllabus

Introduction to critical approaches

Assignment of list of literary terms

Assignment of questions for “The Sacrificial Egg” and “The Bound Man”

 

Homework:

Go over literary terms.

Read “The Sacrificial Egg” by Chinua Achebe p. 5 and “The Bound Man” by Ilse Aichinger p. 9

 

Week Two: 9/7—9/13

Peer group discussion of “The Sacrificial Egg” by Chinua Achebe p. 5

Assignment of questions for “The Bound Man” by Ilse Aichinger p. 9

Homework:

Read “The Bound Man” by Ilse Aichinger p. 9.

 

Week Three: 9/14—9/20

Peer group discussion “The Bound Man” by Ilse Aichinger p. 9

Assignment of questions for “Little Whale, Varnisher of Reality” by Vasily Akenov p. 18

Homework:

Read “Little Whale, Varnisher of Reality” by Vasily Akenov p. 18

 

Week Four: 9/21—9/27

Peer group discussion “Little Whale, Varnisher of Reality” by Vasily Akenov p. 18

Assignment of questions for “The Child Screams and Looks Back at You” by Russell Banks p. 65

Homework:

Read “The Child Screams and Looks Back at You” by Russell Banks p. 65

 

Week Five: 9/28—10/4

Peer group discussion “The Child Screams and Looks Back at You” by Russell Banks p. 65

Assignment of questions for “Cortes and Montezuma” by Donald Barthelme p. 71

Homework:

Read “Cortes and Montezuma” by Donald Barthelme p. 71

 

Week Six: 10/5—10/11

Peer group discussion “Cortes and Montezuma” by Donald Barthelme p. 71

Assignment of questions for “First Love” by Samuel Beckett p. 82

Homework:

Read “First Love” by Samuel Beckett p. 82.

Work on paper.

 

Week Seven: 10/12—10/18

Peer group discussion “First Love” by Samuel Beckett p. 82

Assignment of questions for “Action Will Be Taken” by Henrich Boll p. 94

Homework:

Read “Action Will Be Taken” by Henrich Boll p. 94.

Work on paper.

 

Week Eight: 10/19—10/25

Peer group discussion “Action Will Be Taken” by Henrich Boll p. 94

Assignment of questions for “This Way for the Gas Ladies and Gentlemen” by Tadeus Z. Borowski p. 110

Homework:

Read “This Way for the Gas Ladies and Gentlemen” by Tadeus Z. Borowski p. 110.

Paper due.  E-mail paper to pschepon@mc3.edu

 

Week Nine: 10/26—11/1

Peer group discussion “This Way for the Gas Ladies and Gentlemen” by Tadeus Z. Borowski p. 110

Assignment of questions for “Cowardice” by Abdeslam Boulaich p. 122 and “The Adulterous Woman” by Albert Camus p. 173

Homework:

Read “Cowardice” by Abdeslam Boulaich p. 122 and “The Adulterous Woman” by Albert Camus p. 173.

 

Week Ten: 11/2—11/8

Peer group discussion “Cowardice” by Abdeslam Boulaich p. 122 and “The Adulterous Woman” by Albert Camus p. 173

Assignment of questions for “Fat” by Raymond Carver p. 197, and “The Mother” by Natalia Ginzburg p. 323

Homework:

Read “Fat” by Raymond Carver p. 197, and “The Mother” by Natalia Ginzburg p. 323.

 

Week Eleven: 11/9—11/15

Peer group discussion “Fat” by Raymond Carver p. 197, and “The Mother” by Natalia Ginzburg p. 323

Assignment of questions for “The Life of Imagination” by Nadine Gordimer p. 331 and “Two Gentle People” by Graham Greene p. 341

Homework:

Read “The Life of Imagination” by Nadine Gordimer p. 331 and “Two Gentle People” by Graham Greene p. 341.

 

Week Twelve: 11/16—11/22

Peer group discussion “The Life of Imagination” by Nadine Gordimer p. 331 and “Two Gentle People” by Graham Greene p. 341

Assignment of questions for “One Arm” by Yasunari Kawabata p. 351, “Communist” by Richard Ford p. 282, and “Let the Old Dead Make Room for the Young Dead” by Milan Kundera p. 364

Homework:

Read “One Arm” by Yasunari Kawabata p. 351, “Communist” by Richard Ford p. 282, and “Let the Old Dead Make Room for the Young Dead” by Milan Kundera p. 364.

 

 

Week Thirteen: 11/23—11/25   **** Thanksgiving Holiday: 11/26—11/30 ****

Peer group discussion “One Arm” by Yasunari Kawabata p. 351, “Communist” by Richard Ford p. 282, and “Let the Old Dead Make Room for the Young Dead” by Milan Kundera p. 364

 

Week Fourteen: 12/1—12/6

Assignment of questions for “The Habit of Loving” by Doris Lessing p. 385, “Patriotism” by Yukio Mishima p. 459, “Naga” by R.K. Narayan p. 502, and  “Suicides” by Cesare Pavese p. 601

Homework:

Read “The Habit of Loving” by Doris Lessing p. 385, “Patriotism” by Yukio Mishima p. 459, “Naga” by R.K. Narayan p. 502, “Suicides” by Cesare Pavese p. 601, and “Talpa” by Juan Rulfo p. 650.

Work on final.

 

Week Fifteen: 12/7—12/12

Peer group discussion “The Habit of Loving” by Doris Lessing p. 385, “Patriotism” by Yukio Mishima p. 459, “Naga” by R.K. Narayan p. 502, “Suicides” by Cesare Pavese p. 601, and “Talpa” by Juan Rulfo p. 650.

 

 Final exam due.   E-mail paper to pschepon@mc3.edu